PEOPLE

Principal Investigator

keisuke_fukuda_pic_2016
Keisuke Fukuda, Ph.D. (keisuke.fukuda[at]utoronto.ca)

For more information about the PI, click here!!!

Graduate Students

Caitlin Tozios

Projects this lab member is working on: NreppNopp, Senior Metacognition.

mmexport1499816224967
Caitlin Tozios (caitlin.tozios[at]mail.utoronto.ca)

Hi there, I’m Caitlin, and I am K’s Ph.D. student in the lab. I completed my BSc here at the University of Toronto, majoring in psychology and neuroscience, and I finished my MSc at Wilfrid Laurier University. My thesis, An Examination of Imagined Contexts: The Unreliability of Context-Dependent Memory Effects in Recall was supervised by Dr. W. Hockley, and we studied whether the effects of worse memory recall for words after changing physical contexts could be mitigated by reinstating imagined contexts at retrieval.

My current research interests lie in improving memory retrieval through methods directly applied at the retrieval stage or during encoding processes. Studying the reasons why some strategies may work better than others, or why some may fail or are ineffective, will inform us and enrich our mnemonic environment. I am also interested in metamemory and aging. That is, how do older adults perceive their own memory abilities and judgments and how do they use this to inform memory decisions?

Outside of school, I love to take naps (usually with my son (cat) named Beaty) because I was born a sleepy baby and can never get enough. I miss the days when my metabolism was better and I could eat more junk, but I still love rice and noodles and fried chicken; and in the never-ending quest to be seemingly relevant – exploring new restaurants all over the place. You can usually find me in the lab at UTM, downtown for classes, or in IKEA.

Ben Park

 Projects this lab member is working on: Visual Working Memory Reset, Pacman.

benlolpsy
Ben Park

How do we perceive, select, process, retain, and retrieve visual information? How might we improve our working capacity with this information? I’m Ben and my current goal is to (learn to) exercise computer-assisted behavioral, EEG, and fMRI measures to confront these long-standing questions! My current projects (2019) aim to decipher how our Visual Working Memory (VWM) system can update its representations across time. Future prospects include real-time EEG and behavioral analysis, attentional selection and suppression, transfer of information involving VWM and/or Long-Term Memory, brain-computer-interface design, and data visualization. Especially during exam season, I enjoy driving/racing cars, playing/making music, gaming, anime, programming, tennis, or Korean food. Feel free to follow me on Insta for updates on research and hobbies: ‘benfpv’!

Joseph Saito

Projects this lab member is working on: Retrieval Induced Memory Alteration (RIMA).

joe
Joseph Saito

Joe (B.A. ’16, University of San Francisco) is a Ph.D. student in the Fukuda Lab. He is broadly interested in the ways that memory is influenced by attention. His work in the lab combines computerized behavioral tasks and EEG to evaluate how attentional regulation can be improved and how existing memories can be changed or “biased” by the processing of similar, yet novel information. In doing so, he hopes to discover how we can better select for the information we want in our memory and understand how that information is integrated or made distinct from existing mental representations.

When he’s not doing science, he enjoys anything/everything MLB, NBA, & NFL. He also frequents the gym, where he works out the stress of dealing with MATLAB.

LAB MANAGER

Projects this lab member is working on: Countermanding, SRFB.

Fatima Wasif

fatima
Fatima Wasif

I’m Fatima, the Fukuda Lab’s very own lab manager! I received an HBSc from the University of Toronto in 2019, where I specialized in Psychology and majored in Biology for Health Science. Currently, my academic interests center around cognitive control and executive function, focusing specifically on the neural mechanisms of cognitive conflict, response inhibition, and consequently, reactive versus proactive control. Additionally, I am interested in how individual trust, preference, and learning is altered by manipulations of the credibility of reinforcing feedback. My ultimate hope is to be able to understand what social, cognitive, psychological, and cultural factors drive decision making centered around inhibition of action and its implications for individuals who experience disinhibition.

My “outside-the-lab” interests include watching Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown, going to the movies, and eating oranges. Sometimes I read. Other times I run.

 

CURRENT PROJECT LEADERS AT THE FUKUDA LAB

Amanda Leonetti

Projects this lab member is working on: Value-driven Attentional Capture, CM Manual.

amanda
Amanda Leonetti

My name is Amanda and I am a biology and psychology double major in my fourth year at UTM. I am particularly puzzled by the methods and processes that occur when we learn and unlearn information. Specifically, what neuronal activity occurs in response to learning or unlearning?

My current research is centered around learning and unlearning valuable information. I am interested in how valuable information is learned and why value tends to involuntarily capture attention. Additionally, I am interested in unlearning value. What neural activity is occurring that allows an individual to unlearn valuable information? I am also interested in response inhibition, focusing on implicit learning and unlearning of stop probabilities and the resulting behavioral effect on countermanding and the ability, or inability, to explicitly report learning and unlearning.

Outside of the lab, I am a competitive and recreational dance instructor and I spend the majority of my time with kids!

Lisa Crocco

Projects this lab member is working on: Task Switching.

lisa
Lisa Crocco

My name is Lisa, I recently just graduated from UTM, majoring in Biology for Health Sciences and doing a specialist in Psychology. I am interested in implicit memory, specifically, how we remember irrelevant information from a previous task and why it occurs.

I have previously examined this question by looking at whether participants were able to task switch when different types of primes were present. Additionally, if these primes presented were beneficial or hindered memory. Results gathered from this study were quite interesting and differed from previous literature! Currently, I am running a follow-up study to further expand on why these results occurred. However, when I’m not studying memory, I’m usually binging Netflix!

Rosa Torres

Projects this lab member is working on: Retrieval Induced Forgetting (RIF).

ROSA
Rosa Torres

Hello, my name is Rosa, and I am a current project leader at K’s lab. I am quite interested in making memory and attention more efficient. How do we forget information we deem unimportant/negative to stop using up precious brain space? How do we determine what to ignore during encoding? How can we optimize that? To be the most efficient person I can be I must understand how these processes work, and so that is what I am currently trying to do.

My current project is about RIF and when to make it happen, to see if it can be used in more real-world scenarios since the information we often want to forget is not encoded on that very same day. My end goal is to figure out how to manipulate LTM to benefit us the most; I don’t want any distracting information getting in the way. Because of this, I eventually seek to incorporate VWM and attention into the equation.

Outside of the lab, I enjoy singing, attempting to play tennis, and trying new foods though my number one craving is steamed pork dumplings.

CURRENT VOLUNTEERS AT THE FUKUDA LAB

Ala Refai

Ala.JPG
Ala Refai

Hello, friends! My name is Ala Refai, and I’m specializing in psychology. My research interests include speech, language, and memory. Previously, I have worked on a research project exploring whether toddler’s use emotion to learn new words. In Dr. Johnson’s Lab, I’m currently completing an honors thesis project on the effects of accents and grammar in children’s performance on the famous marshmallow task!

Beyond this, I am fascinated by the plasticity and capacity of memory. From my experiences at Trillium Health Partners in the Neuro-Rehabilitation Aphasia Program as well as the Food School at Pediatric Outpatient Services, I am passionate about becoming a speech-language pathologist. I still haven’t decided whether I want to help children or whether I want to focus on helping those with aphasia.

Outside of school, I really want to learn how to play the violin (please teach me if you know how!). I love shows such as This Is Us, Parks and Rec, and Brooklyn 99. I also love finding new music – my favorite band is Alvvays.

Matthew Kolisnyk

matthew
Matthew Kolisnyk

Often we find ourselves drifting away to thoughts of our own, perhaps while reading through a dense text or listening to a boring lecture. We might think of our plans for the weekend, reminisce about a past event, or ruminate about something dreaded. We refer to this phenomenon as mind-wandering, and it is estimated to occur anywhere from 30 to 50% of our waking lives. Mind-wandering is often operationalized as task-unrelated thought, as is the case with the experiment my colleagues and I will be running: the Metronome Counting Task (MCT). In conjunction with EEG research, we hope to understand what is occurring in the brain when our thoughts decouple from a task.

The seemingly benign phenomenon of mind-wandering opens itself up in exciting ways with questions such as: what happens when we realize that we have gone off task, and subsequently experience a renewal of attention? What happens to our performance on tasks when we mind-wander? Are we in a fundamentally different state of consciousness during these moments? The hope is that by studying the mind through the lens of mind-wandering, we can reveal questions of fundamental import about the nature of thought and consciousness.

In my spare time, I like to play video games, read, program, and do online courses!

Madeline Tombran

madeline
Madeline Tombran

Hi! My name is Madeline, and I am currently in my final year as an undergraduate student at UTM. I am majoring in Psychology and Biology for Health Sciences and this year I am incredibly excited to be working in Professor K’s lab as a part of the Meta-Awareness study.

Outside of school I work at a bookstore and spend my free time adventuring with my husky puppy.

Nour El Asswad

nour-e1568569607289.png
Nour El Asswad

Hi, my name is Nour and I am pursuing a double major in Biology for Health Sciences and Psychology.

My research interest has always been in cognitive psychology, especially the memory and attentional aspect as I continue to pursue learning in this field. I hope to gain more of an understanding of meta-awareness and mind-wandering and hopefully be involved in other projects.

My hobbies outside university life include swimming and biking as well as being an avid reader of Lina Maslo books.

Jinfan (Rose) Qiang 

rose
Jinfan Qiang

Hello, my name is Rose. I completed my degree in Economics, and am pursuing a specialist degree in Psychology.  My primary research interests are personality disorders, self-knowledge, and autobiographic memory for trauma. In the Fukuda lab, I am specifically interested in how do we evaluate our memory of the trauma we experienced, and whether trauma can be forgotten and then recalled later in life with meaningfulness. Outside of school, I love singing, hanging out with my friends, listening to their daily lives, and never shut up!

 

 

Shankeerth Suresh

shawn
Shankeerth Suresh

My name is Shawn and I am a fifth-year undergraduate student majoring in Psychology and Criminology. I am interested in abnormal psychology and psychopathology and am also fascinated by human memory and our ability to save and retrieve memories. I myself, and others around me are surprised by the many useful and random tidbits of information that I can hold in my mind.

2006 U.S.A. Memory Champion and a famous author, Joshua Foer’s, renowned book: Moonwalking with Einstein sparked my interest in human learning and memory techniques. Thus, I am interested in testing simple techniques that can use to improve our memory.

 

 

Alumni

April Pereira (2016-2019) Now: MA Cognitive Psychology, University of Waterloo!

Sabina Iqbal (2016-2019) Now: BSN Nursing, University of New Brunswick; Humber College!

Shawal Pall (2016-2019) Now: Ph.D. Clinical Psychology, Fairleigh Dickinson University!

Asma Fadhl (2016 – 2017) Now: BASc Occupational Health and Safety, Ryerson University!

Hirotaka Sone: (2016-2019) Now: Psychology at Toyama University!

Erica Chen (2017) Now: MSc in Health: Science, Technology & Policy, Carleton University!

Anjali Pandey (2017) Now: MSc in Experimental Psychology at Dalhousie University!

Jeanny Kim

Kyana Fletcher

Saphia Shariff

Heidi Cheng

Richard Lee

Kyshona Edwards

David Boshra

Aimen Azfar